Research Links

Video Clips

Release of Mukden POWs

Flying Out

Russian and US Soldiers around a Plane


 

Magazines

Life Magazine articles from the Philippines and Bataan

You may find someone you know in these photos.

Here are links to some Life Magazine articles concerning the Philippines from World War II. All of the links except April 13 & 20, 1942 go directly to the article cited. For those two articles, click on the link and when the magazine appears, click on "Contents". That will give a table of contents from which you can select the article cited. Or, you can type the page number in the box to the right of the "Contents" box.

The February 26, 1945 article about the liberation of Cabanatuan appeared less than four weeks after the "Great Raid". Can you imagine what it was like for families to see photos of POWs being liberated? Unfortunately for families like mine, their POW had been sent on towards Japan about seven weeks before the raid - but we did not learn that until  after the war was over.

John B Lewis sent out this information. He received it from someone whose name is lost.

Thanks to both of you!

December 22, 1941: page 26, "Defenders of the Philippines"

February 9, 1942: page 35, "The Battle of Bataan" - See also "Torpedo Boats Strike in the Pacific" on page 42.

March 30, 1942: page 44, "Farewell to Bataan"

April 13, 1942: page 25, "Philippine Epic"

April 20, 1942: page 32, "Bataan Wounded Lived With Pain"

July 20, 1942: page 34, "Fall of Bataan"

December 6, 1943: page 106, "Tomorrow We Will Be Free"

February 19, 1945: page 19, "U.S. Wins Heart of the Philippines"

February 26, 1945: page 34, "The Rescue at Cabanatuan"

March 5, 1945: page 25, "Santo Tomás is Delivered"

July 17, 1964: page 82, MacArthur's Reminiscences VI, "I'm a little late, but we came"

Roger Mansell's Site Explaining How Men Left Mukden:

http://www.mansell.com/pow_resources/camplists/china_hk/mukden/rescue%20report.html 

http://www.mansell.com/pow_resources/camplists/china_hk/mukden/mukden_evac.html  has the most accurate recreation of evacuation lists. Much clearer than NARA

Page of Links – Unit 731

Links of info to Mukden Camps

Japanese Surrender- in Tokyo Bay Sept 2, 1945 Footage from the USS Missouri with sound. Includes other Allied signers to the document, from New Zealand/Australia to Europe/Russia.


 

Other Sites

Center For Research - Allied POWS Under The Japanese (Roger Mansell - Director)
As stated on their site "The purpose of this site is to provide a primary source of documentation for all of the Allied Prisoners of the Japanese. "
http://www.mansell.com/pow_resources/camplists/china_hk/mukden/hoten_main.htm This link goes to the Center's Mukden page, go to their home page for information about other camps and POWs held by the Japanese. 

Timeline of Mukden Camp

Site for the detailed study of Guam and ALL Allied POWS used as SLAVES by the Japanese in World War II.

Never Forgotten - website of the Taiwan POW Camps Memorial Society

US-Japan Dialogue on POWs website
http://www.us-japandialogueonpows.org/BrownTrip.htm A
trip arranged by  Japanese researcher Kinue Tukudome for one of the POWs, Bob Brown. The home page is: http://www.us-japandialogueonpows.org/

Prisoners of War of the Japanese 1942-1945
http://www.pows-of-japan.net/

West Point
http://www.west-point.org/family/adbc/ and http://www.west-point.org/family/japanese-pow/

Proviso East High School - Bataan Commemorative Research Project
History of the 192nd Tank Batalion

POWs of Japan.net
http://www.pows-of-japan.net/booksetc/HOTEN-CAMP-MUKDEN-MANCHURIA.pdf

Researching Far East POW History
http://www.researchingfepowhistory.org.uk/

About the Japanese Apology
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fl20090726x4.html

Quilt Plans for ADBC Museum

The Maywood Bataan Day Organization was formed in 1942 to provide support to the families of POWS captured by the Japanese after the fall of Bataan.
 


 

Other Organizations

American Defenders of Bataan & Corregidor Memorial Society


 

Notes on the MPOWRS Site

This is not original research. It is a compilation of as many resources as we could find. Why reinvent the wheel? When sources conflicted, we took the majority view of our sources or used the computer to try to come up with what seems like the most correct information. For spellings of American names, Roger Mansell ruled. Despite the attempts to make these lists accurate, there are still likely to be errors in them. Please contact us to correct them at info@mukdenpows.org.

Roger Mansell and researchers compiled an extensive list of those who were at Mukden and those who died at Mukden.  This information was supplemented from the lists in Never Plan Tomorrow by Joseph Petak, the lists made by Col. Malcolm V. Fortier and the lists found at the National Archives. Michael Hurst has been very helpful with names, suggestions, and other info, and Pat Lee supplies the information her Dad saved of the men who served with him. The NM Historical Society. Jim Opolony, Sheldon Zimbler have also been a huge help.

Assigned numbers

There were probably 1429 men who arrived at the old camp on November 11, 1942. They received numbers with in a few days of arrival.

This list was created by cross checking Petak (better on enlisted men), Fortier (better on officers), Mansell (solid on Americans), and NARA lists. The least helpful is the evacuation list from NARA, although the one on Roger Mansell’s website has been corrected, added to, and alphabetized to the point of being quite useful.

Four men had 2 numbers assigned to them. We have been unable to place names with some numbers that seem likely to have had been assigned Thus in the list of men by number, we would suggest the following alterations.

POW #             Nat/branch    Rank              Name                               Date of Death

1557A

USMC

PFC

Loverix, Campbell

Nov 21/42

1557B

BA

Maj Gen

Key, Berthold W.

 

1558A

USN

Cox

Schneider,William T

Dec 27/42

1558B

BA

Brig

Keith-Simmons, F

 

1559A

USA

Cpl

John S Urban

Oct 14/42

1559B

BA

AVM

Maltby, P.R.

 

1560A

USA

??

Anderson, Milan

Nov 7/42

1560B

BA

Maj Gen

Sitwell, Hervey D.W.

 

1561A/95

USN

WR2C

Tulloch, PS

Nov 20/42

1561B

BA

Maj Gen

Maltby, C.M.

 

1562A/96

USA

Sgt

Brown, GJ

Nov 9/42

1562B

BA

Brig

Backhouse, EHW

 

1563A

USA

??

Aulds, James

See below

1563B

BA

Brig

Ballentine, G. C. 

 

1564A

USA

Sgt

Uphoff, Charles F.

Nov 7/42

1564B

BA

Brig

Challen, Bernard S.

 

1565A

USA

Cpl

Cigoi, Walter F

Nov 3/42

1565B

BA

Brig

Crawford, Ben B. S.

 

1566A

USMC

??

Jessup, John Joseph

See below

1566B

BA

Brig

Curtis, Arthur D.

 

1567A

USA

Cpl

Miller, Harry I

Nov 3/42

1567B

BA

Brig

Duke, Cecil L. B. 

 

1568A/100

USA

Pvt

Lay, Billy W

Oct 31/42

1568B

BA

Brig

Evelegh, George C.

 

1569A

?

 

 

 

1569B

BA

Brig

Fraser, Francis H.

 

1570A

USA

??

Aiken, TL

See below

1570B

BA

Brig

Goodman, Eric W.

 

1571

BA

Brig

Lay, William O.

 

1572A

USMC

??

Dean, Ben J

See below

1572B

BA

Brig

Lucas, Hubert F.

 

1573A

USA

??

Estel, B J

See below

1573B

BA

Brig

Massy-Beresford, TH

 

1574A

USA

??

Lewis, Corley B

See below

1574B

BA

Brig

Moir, RG

 

1575A

?

 

 

 

1575B

BA

Brig

Newbingging, TK

 

1576A

?

 

 

 

1576B

BA

Brig

Painter, GWA

 

1577A

?

 

 

 

1577B

BA

Brig

Richards, CW

 

1578A

?

 

 

 

1578B

BA

Brig

Rusher, AE

 

1579A

USMC

PFC

Bertram, William P

Dec 6/42

1579B

BA

Brig

Selby, Wallace R

 

 

If there is a pattern here, 5 names are probably missing.

James V Aulds, #1563A, SGT,7002615,AC,27 BG 16 BS  was presumed by his shipmates to have died and been buried at sea. However, Roger’s extensive research shows he survived, and was transferred at Takao. He was rescued at Hak-04-Ashibetsu where he was killed by a crate of food dropped from a B-29.

Also transferred at Takao and believed to have died at sea by Petak were:

Jessup, John Joseph,#1566A, CPL,301363,USMC,4th K Rescued Fukuoka area

Thomas Aiken, #1570A, of 19052834,ORD,724 Ord (Avn),  Rescued from Taiwan-  06-Taihoku. 

Dean, Benjamin J. Jr.,#1572A, PFC,273440,USMC,4th D, Rescued Fuk-24B-Senryu

Estel, David G. "D.J.",#1573A, CPL,19028236,CAC,60th Hq, Rescued Taiwan-06-Taihoku

Lewis, Corley B.#1574A, PVT,15065814,CAC,60th D, Rescued Taiwan-03-Heito

Men such as the ones listed above are not included as Mukden POWs list because they are carried on lists for other camps, but their friends, who believed they had died on the way to Mukden, gave them numbers.

With the exceptions of men numbered 34 – 101, POWs with #s 1 - 1556  arrived at the old camp on November 11, 1942. Brits and Yanks were amazed to find each other on the train north from Pusan (Fusan) Korea.  The British were amazed at the poor condition of many of the Americans.

Most of the numbers 67 through and including 94 are missing names, but we found a name for #78 ( a British Private) and so have reason to believe these numbers were assigned, but the names are  lost.

Jim Erickson, son of Albert Erickson #1923, provided the following information:

POW #s 1888 and above arrived on 29 April 45.  Most of this group
consisted of survivors of the Oryoku/Enoura/Brazil Marus.  Some of these were men who had been taken to Japan from Taiwan in March 45 and there were a small number were men who had been held in various camps in Japan since mid 1944 or earlier.

POW #s 1557-1873 arrived at the Main camp on 20 May 1945.  This group
consisted mostly of senior officers who had been held on Taiwan since
1942.  Most of the these men, except the generals and a few enlisted
men, were taken from Taiwan to Japan aboard Oryoku Maru in Oct 44.
After a short time in Japan they went to Hoten Branch camp #1, located in Teikaton (Cheng Shiatun)

The reason why the men who arrived in May have lower numbers is that
they were assigned POWs #s when they went to Mukden branch camp #1 in
mid Nov 1944. 

This is also why the B-29 crews have numbers 1874-1887. They arrived in Manchuria in Dec 44, after the senior officers, but before the 25 April 45 group.

Thanks, Jim!

Evacuation dates

The lack of an evacuation date may help point to a death. However at least 47 men departed without being named on those lists, so it is only an indication.

Some POW numbers were assigned to men who died on the way to Mukden or soon after arrival and were later reassigned. Thus some numbers have A and B; A being the man who got the number first and B being the one who was given the recycled number.

Some men died on their way home. While they did not die at the camp, they were “of” the camp and so their deaths are included. Dates and causes of deaths of men who died after release are noted when the information is found.

Men headed for Mukden or who died after rescue, are included as they are “of” the Mukden Camp or no other POW Camp.

The only POW totally unaccounted for is William J Lynch #607. His whereabouts is unknown, but there are 2 theories. One is that he was taken by Unit 731 for experimentation, and the other is that he just wanted to go home. Some of his fellow POWs believe he left camp once, was caught, returned and punished severely. They believe it is possible he left camp again and was killed to keep it from happening yet again.

It would appear that about 2200 men were assigned to Mukden before the end of the war. Some like General Wainwright, barely set foot in the main camp, although he spent time at a Mukden sub camp.

Of the first 1494 numbers in the NARA lists, 36 – 102 were left blank for future arrivals.

Another 62 did not arrive alive. Their numbers were 1495 through 1556. Except for 2 British and 1 Australian on the way to camp, The only non American who died at the camp was a Brit who was killed in the accidental bombing of the camp on Dec 7, 1944. At least 60 died after arrival Nov 11, to Nov 30, 1942. Nearly 100 died in December 42. Another 44 died in January 1942. Those men died due to dysentery, malaria, beri beri, starvation, and pellagra that they acquired in the Philippines. Add to that the pneumonia that took many in their weakened condition when they arrived at the extremely cold weather of northern China. In the first 2.5 months in the camp, at least 206 men died. After that, the death rate slowed.

During  most of the years, the camp had roughly 1250 men at Mukden divided between those who stayed at the main camp and worked at the camp or at MKK or the metal works, and others who worked at the tannery or the canvas making factory and lived near those places. The camp commanders were paid by those businesses for the use of the POWs.

On Dec 7, 1944 a B-29 got a bomb stuck in the bomb bay during a bombing raid, and had to eject the bomb. The Japanese did not mark POW camps or hell ships, so they dropped it on the camp which they thought might be a factory. 19 men were killed.

Another 8 died on the way home when a mine hit their rescue ship or their rescue plane crashed as it approached the Philippines.

#609 is listed twice as Ernest Harris and Clark Savage are the same person according to NARA research.

2nd Bn The Loyals/18th Btn. Recon Cps -  2 names, one batallion. When the men signed up in England, they joined the 2nd Bn The Loyals. This is the name that their families had from before the war or early in the war years. As the war continued, their name was formally changed to 18th Btn. Recon Cps. This is the name used in official records at the end of the war. We include both to make a more complete record.